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  #1 ()
kayattsag : Does it help or harm if you always pay off your credit card bill in full? OR is it better to leave some of the debt on the card (I don't know how to say that any better), i.e. you just pay off a percentage of the bill leaving some of it behind?
@ Steer - So it IS better to pay off in FULL every month vs. leave some behind?

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  #2 ()
emapseassew : The best way to build credit is to charge as much as you can pay off each month, and then pay it off by the due date each month. That is the fastest way to build your credit.

Credit card credit does not impact your report as much as other types of credit. Financing a car, for example, and making timely payments will have a greater effect on raising your credit score.
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  #3 ()
plaulvavoselt : YOU NEVER EVER GAIN BY LEAVING A BALANE ON CC ALWAYS PAY IN FULL
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  #4 ()
Irrelrylole : There is absolutely NO advantage to carrying balances and making payments. It just costs interest. Use the card, wait for the statement, and pay the balance in full every month. That will build credit and avoid interest.

In fact, carrying balances of more than 30% of your limit will actually hurt your score.
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  #5 ()
Android Phones : My "OS (C:)" is completely filled up and I've never even touched my "Data (D:)" and it's 254 gb. More importantly, can I use it to store software/ programs?
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  #6 ()
sleemnavalolo : your drive D: is 254 GB free space? sure, why not??
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  #7 ()
biddeteemict : When you add everything to the C: drive where you OS is and fill it up completely, you will make your computer very slow. A hard drive partition should never be filled to more than 80% capacity.
Put all you can onto the D: drive. You may have to uninstall and reinstall programs to make the links to them correct. It depends on what your OS is--some are better than others. That is a guess because you keep your OS a secret. There are some utilities to do proper migration, even of programs.
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  #8 ()
voitrolovon : D: should be the second partition of your hard disk .Of course , you can fill its free space with files.You paid for that .
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  #9 ()
Exerierok : This is a fairly technical question so probably for intermediate to advanced Excel users only (and database knowledge would be a plus too).

Basically, I want to get lots of data into Excel to feed lots of pivot tables. Its about 600,000 rows by 50 fields. I have been outputting this file from SAS into a CSV file and then reading the CSV into Excel via an external connection. Bare in mind this is an office environment and both CSV and Excel files are held on a LAN that itself has lots of traffic.

I need the pivot tables to auto update on opening the file. So when I open the Excel, it pulls in the CSV data and the pivots update. This takes between 2 - 4 minutes, dependent on the LAN traffic. This is an eternity.

Is there any way to get this volume of data into Excel for use in pivot tables? Storing it in the actual Excel file is possible but the file becomes HUGE and its still very slow.

All ideas are welcome.

(I thought I would try Yahoo Answers before going onto more hardcore excel sites as the solution might be simple)

Thanks!
Some details for those who requested:

- Data is updated weekly but it should be able to handle adhoc updates as well
- It is needed at any time and by many people
- The data is changed every time it runs. At the end of the month the change is large. Otherwise minor alterations
- Excel is only used as a dashboard for the data. Its an interactive dashboard (i.e. the user can filter graphs and tables etc with activeX dropdowns) hence the need for such a large quantity of data.
- One location only
Some details for those who requested:

- Data is updated weekly but it should be able to handle adhoc updates as well
- It is needed at any time and by many people
- The data is changed every time it runs. At the end of the month the change is large. Otherwise minor alterations
- Excel is only used as a dashboard for the data. Its an interactive dashboard (i.e. the user can filter graphs and tables etc with activeX dropdowns) hence the need for such a large quantity of data.
- One location only
Some details for those who requested:

- Data is updated weekly but it should be able to handle adhoc updates as well
- It is needed at any time and by many people
- The data is changed every time it runs. At the end of the month the change is large. Otherwise minor alterations
- Excel is only used as a dashboard for the data. Its an interactive dashboard (i.e. the user can filter graphs and tables etc with activeX dropdowns) hence the need for such a large quantity of data.
- One location only
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  #10 ()
enurmouse : Hi ene, I think a little more information is needed:

- How often is the data updated?
- How often is the data opened in Excel? Is there a time of day that the data is not needed?
- How much of the data changes each update?
- Is the data changed/saved in excel, or is the excel side only used for reference?
- Is the data opened in excel from multiple locations?
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