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  #1 ()
Modirdred : I don't mean audacity either, i need something that is comparable to Cubase Le4, I need to re-register it, but I can't at the moment... what is a comparable free music program?

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  #2 ()
j Baume du tigre : can i cash this in by myself or what do i need to do. i don't have a bank account or anything like that
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more..
  #3 ()
Ererryhew : You should get a bank account - certainly doable at your age. I've had an account at a far younger age.
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  #4 ()
kedduadwaytum : AI Corporation issued 75,000 shares of $20 par value, cumulative, 6% preferred stock
on January 1, 2011, for $2,200,000. In December 2013, AI declared its first dividend of $500,000.
Instructions
(a) Prepare AI’s journal entry to record the issuance of the preferred stock.
(b) If the preferred stock is not cumulative, how much of the $500,000 would be paid to common
stockholders?
(c) If the preferred stock is cumulative, how much of the $500,000 would be paid to common
stockholders?
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  #5 ()
Gysrere : (a) Prepare AI’s journal entry to record the issuance of the preferred stock.
Dr Cash 2,200,000
Cr Preferred Stock 1,500,000 (75,000 x $20)
Cr Paid-inn Capital in Excess of Par Value 700,000

(b) If the preferred stock is not cumulative, how much of the $500,000 would be paid to common
stockholders?
Total Dividend $500,000
Less: Preferred Stock Dividend 90,000 (1,500,000 x 6%)
Common Stock Dividends $410,000

(c) If the preferred stock is cumulative, how much of the $500,000 would be paid to common
stockholders?
Total Dividend $500,000
Less: Preferred Stock Dividend 270,000 ($1,500,000 x 6% x 3)
Common Stock Dividends $230,000
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  #6 ()
Broumenn : There's this place opening up in my area October 1st. It's firehouse subs. I applied for a job got a call from the owner the next day. He said he wants to meet with me on Wednesday (tomorrow) with him and the other owner. I just want to know what to expect. Like what types of questions they will ask and what not since they're just opening. I figure the only reason they called me is because I'm 17 and don't have to pay me much.
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  #7 ()
fachroarbo : Well first don't go in their with that attitude about them not having to pay you much so this is why they pick you. Jobs can be scarce , and it's not like your resume is chalk full of experience. Everyone has to start some place, you should look at it as wow you got picked to be interviewed over countless unemployeed people who need work too and a pay check.

(Kids today so ungrateful)

So what to expect. They will naturally want to ask you what days and hours are you available to work. If you say you can't work weekends or nights you have a pretty slim chance.

They will ask you when can you start.

They will ask you if you have any previous experience..

They will ask if you have previous experience with customers, or working a cash register.

They may ask you why you are interested in working for them... They want to hear what kind of answer you give.

To show your interested you can ask when will they be open for business. towards the end of the interview you could ask when will they be making their decision. And should I follow up and give you a call , or will you be contacting me?

Thats about all.
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  #8 ()
doorriels : I have done some research & was not sure exactly how this works. Me & my wife have had our home for 5 years. Its valued at 125k & we purchased it as a foreclousure for 85k on a 30yr loan. I know there are ways to refinance to get equity out, but my question is, if we actually sell it for 125k & whats ever left after bank fees, closing cost, etc, do we receive a check for the rest thats left? This is our first home. Any help would be great. Thank you.
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  #9 ()
Raladrorrurne : Of course.

Anything left over (that is, after repayment of loans, fees etc) Is all yours


However, usually this money is used to find over places to stay. In general, you would have already brought a place and have used the profit from this sale to finance said house
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  #10 ()
RichardDR : Yes, you keep the difference.

Your capital gain would be: Sale price to your buyer - cost of certain improvements - certain fees - the original amount you paid for the home. (See the links.)

There are special rules regarding taxes on capital gains related to the sale of your primary residence. It sounds as if you and your wife will qualify for the exclusion. Since you have lived in the home at least 2 of the last 5 years (and since it appears that you haven't used the exclusion in the last two years) you can exclude up to $500,000 in gain related to the sale when filing jointly. What this means for you is that you will not have to pay capital gains tax on the net proceeds from the sale of the home. (See the links for more detailed info.)

Your capital gain is different from your net proceeds from the sale...the largest factor being that you will receive your down payment as part of the proceeds. (See example at end.)

When you sell your home you keep the net amount of: sale price to your buyer - fees (e.g. attorneys fees, realtor fees, certain closing costs) - real estate taxes prorated to the sale date - mortgage payoff = net amount. (<This is a general list.) Whoever said you have to keep paying the bank is a nut-job. The loan gets paid off when you sell the home, typically at closing in order to properly transfer title. You get a check, usually at closing, for the net amount.

Then you find a new place to live - e.g. buy another house, rent, sleep on the beach. :)

Example:
Say you purchased the home for $90k , put $5k down, and got an $85k loan. To make this example simple, let's say there were no improvements made and there are no fees when you buy or sell.
You sell the home for $125k.
Your capital gain is: 125k - 90k = $35k
Your net proceeds from the sale are: 125k - mortgage 85k = $40k

Hope this helps instead of confuses!
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